Student accused of murdering Texas Tech officer used stolen gun: cops



The shooter arrested on the campus of Texas Tech College after he allegedly murdered a police officer might face further federal fees for utilizing a stolen gun.

Hollis Daniels, 19, was indicted on Wednesday by a federal grand jury for possession of a stolen firearm, in line with everythinglubbock.com. The younger school scholar additionally has been charged with capital homicide of a peace officer.

The incident occurred on Monday when Texas Tech campus police introduced Daniels to the campus police station after discovering proof of medicine and drug paraphernalia in his dorm room. On the station, the freshman pulled out a gun and allegedly shot an officer within the head earlier than fleeing on foot. Daniels was later apprehended by campus police close to the Lubbock Municipal Coliseum.

Officers with Texas Tech confirmed to KXAS 5 that Daniels didn’t use a police division gun within the capturing. Unique stories advised that he might have stolen the gun from a police officer whereas he was detained on the station.

Officers initially have been referred to as to Daniels’ dorm room to conduct a welfare examine after they acquired complaints that a scholar was appearing erratic and should have had a weapon. Whereas they discovered the drug contraband, cops didn’t discover a weapon on Daniels till he pulled it out and opened hearth on the station.

Underneath Texas’ lately carried out campus carry regulation, Daniels was too younger to even possess a handgun within the state — not to mention on a university campus.

Signed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott in 2015 and going into impact in August 2016, the campus carry regulation mirrors state coverage that stipulates that candidates for a hid carry allow have to be at the least 21 years previous and haven’t any felony convictions, amongst different circumstances.

Texas is one in every of 10 states within the nation that allows the carrying of hid weapons on school campuses. When the state regulation went into impact in 2016, it instantly raised considerations amongst some college students, school, and activists within the Lone Star State over the security of getting firearms on campus.

Fox Information’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this text.



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